English riding school

English riding

Wikipedia defines English riding as an equestrian discipline with many different styles, that usually requires riders to use both hands on the reins, rather than just one hand, as is seen in western riding. Riders also frequently “post” or “rise” to the trot called “posting trot”.

English riding features a flat English saddle without the deep seat, high cantle or saddle horn seen on a Western saddle nor the knee pads seen on an Australian Stock Saddle. English bridles also vary in style based on discipline, but most feature some type of cavesson noseband as well as closed reins, buckled together at the ends, that prevents them from dropping on the ground if a rider becomes unseated. Clothing for riders in competition is usually based on traditional needs from which a specific style of riding developed, but most standards require, as a minimum, boots; breeches or jodhpurs; a shirt with some form of tie or stock; a hat, cap, or equestrian helmet; and a jacket.

Our equestrian center offers English riding lessons for adults and children, beginners or even advanced riders, both in the manege as well as in open terrain.

The riding school at “La Mesteceni” is twinned with the famous Sue Adam’s Riding School from Shobdon, Herefordshire, England and benefits of instructors trained at this facility.

Our team includes local as well as international riders with specific training and years of experience; our stables host 10 superb examples of pure breeds and mixed blood-lines, large horses, small horses and youngsters in training.

Children can also join one of our dedicated horse camps, where they can take riding lessons suited for them, learn about nature and have fun outdoor activites.

Being a Rider

How long will I take to become a rider?
This is a frequent question the impatient novice will ask the instructor. Well, you can learn in just a month, but a lifetime is not sufficient to reach perfection!

The Romanian horse whisperer
He was a noble caballero whose entire life had been devoted to horses. Not only was it said of him that he was a very dignified and humble man, but everyone who saw him ride was enthralled by the performance, and deeply moved by his riding ability.
At the age of 96 years, as he lay on his deathbed, he called for his nephew to come to him so that he might bid him farewell. And so it happened: as the nephew was finally turning away to leave the room he saw, for the first time, tears in his uncle’s eyes. The old man reached out for the younger man’s hand and said softly: “It is such a misfortune that I must die just now”.
“Why?” asked his nephew, tenderly stroking the old man’s hand. “This time comes for every man, and you have had such a long, rich, blessed life”.

“Yes”, said the old one, “you are right, but it was only a week ago that I first realized what it means to truly ride a horse”.

A close relationship between man and horse should not be a difficult and long process. It is in fact a recall of an ancestral partnership as old as mankind. Riding is second nature for man, a skill that can be easily acquired in its basic form. Paramount is the respect for the horse and once discovered it becomes true love.

If you also love nature, you will then appreciate the extraordinary gift of riding into the horizon: reaching places you will have never reached on foot and enjoying a different angle on sights from the comfort of your saddle.